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The Napa Valley Film Festival Fêtes its Debut

The Napa Valley Film Festival Fêtes its Debut


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One of the hottest tickets at Sundance 2011 wasn’t a film. Rather, it was the launch party for the Napa Valley Film Festival, which debuts this November 9–13. Sixteen Napa wineries came to Park City to pour the good stuff — 90+ point, limited-production wines from Carneros to Calistoga — while celebrity chef Michael Chiarello was on hand to provide delectable small bites made to match.

“We decided to bet the farm,” says festival cofounder Marc Lhormer of the classy kickoff. He and Brenda Lhormer ponied up to become an official Sundance Institute Associate, which enabled them to hold the tasting at the Sundance House and get word out to invited directors, agents, press, and other film industry movers-and-shakers. “We decided to buy a Super Bowl ad — to go out big and announce ourselves to the world,” Brenda Lhormer says of the Sundance venue.

The Sonoma-based couple are no strangers to the film scene, having produced Bottle Shock (2008), a riff on the legendary 1976 Judgment of Paris that put California wine on the map. They also took over the Sonoma County Film Festival in 2002 and ran that for seven years. “Bottle Shock got us involved with people in Napa, and they said, ‘Why does tiny Sonoma have this festival? Why don’t we have one?’” Marc Lhormer recalls. “So we said, ‘Let’s work on that.’”

While the Sonoma event was confined to the town of Sonoma, the new Napa festival will be much bigger, spread out over four communities: Napa, Yountville, St. Helena, and Calistoga. “Sonoma was almost an apprenticeship before moving on to the big stage,” says Marc Lhormer.

The Napa festival will showcase some 30 features that premiered earlier in the year at top indie film festivals. “Sundance is beginning of the annual calendar,” says Marc Lhormer. “Our intent with Napa is to close the year, showcasing the best films that premiered at Sundance or South by Southwest or Tribeca or the LA Film Fest. So we’re cherrypicking the best and complementing that with a sprinkling of films that come out between Thanksgiving and Christmas and have Oscar buzz.” These will be rounded out with 30 shorts, plus a program of student films from local high schools. The films will cycle between towns, playing at venues created specifically for the event. As in Sonoma, the organizers aim to “integrate food and wine into the film-going experience, both on the way in — with wine tastings in the lobbies of theaters—and afterwards,” Marc Lhormer says.

Working with the Napa Valley Vintners Association, the Lhormers corraled 16 wineries for the Sundance party, mostly boutique producers making only several thousand cases annually. The lineup included Allora, John Anthony, David Arthur, Cimarossa, Chiarello, Tom Eddy, Farella Park, Gargiulo, Gemstone, Matthiasson, Parallel Napa Valley, Salvestrin, and Staglin Family Vineyard, as well as Chimney Rock (one of Terlato’s many Stags Leap AVA properties), and Raymond Vineyard & Cellar (now part of Jean-Charles Boisset’s empire).

Among the room’s standouts was the Matthiasson 2009 Napa Valley White, a unique blend of Sauvignon Blanc with Ribolla Gialla and Tocai, two grapes native to Friuli in northeast Italy. Steve Matthiasson, a viticultural consultant for such Napa luminaries as Far Niente and Spottswood, is among the half-dozen producers in Sonoma and Napa working with Ribolla Gialla, a plump, yellow, acidic grape from the Collio region bordering Slovenia. These Ribolla grapes are from cuttings first brought to California by George Vare of Luna Vineyards, who took them from vineyards in Oslavia owned by the grand master of Ribolla himself, Josko Gravner. This blend — Matthiasson’s first white — is a gorgeous, mouthwatering marriage of stone fruit and minerality that rivals the best of Italy’s Collio Biancos.

More typical of Napa were the several excellent Bordeaux blends. The crowning achievement was Gargiulo’s G Major Seven Study, a Cabernet-keyed symphony whose sustained note of acidity created a wine of great elegance and finesse.

Topping the list of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignons from the wonderful 2007 vintage was that from longtime grower John Anthony, who founded his eponymous label in 2003. His 100-percent Cabernet showcased that vintage’s dark, ripe fruit while adding an interesting savory backnote.

Cabernet usually doesn’t play nicely with appetizers, but Michael Chiarello — host of Food Network’s Easy Entertaining and owner/chef of Bottega restaurant in Yountville — expertly supplied some harmonious companions, including a ground lamb skewer flecked with onions and raisins that looked like a miniature gyros log but tasted like none other. Then there was his truffle, a squishy ball of chocolate, basil, and balsamic that combined to awesome effect. In addition to playing chef, Chiarello was also presenting two of his own wines: a succulent Zinfandel from pre-Prohibition vines and a pure Ribolla Gialla.

Billing itself as “1 part food, 2 parts wine, 3 parts film, 4 parts festival,” the Napa Valley Film Festival made a good impression on the wine and food front with this Sundance fête. In November, we’ll know whether all the component parts have come into harmonious balance, or whether this festival still needs time to evolve.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Not Coming Soon: John Malkovich's Louis XIII Cognac Film

Louis XIII de Rémy Martin, the premium Cognac that typically sells for around $3,000 a bottle, is promoting its century-long aging process with a unique marketing spin: It teamed up with actor John Malkovich and director Robert Rodriguez to make a futuristic movie called 100 Years, which won&rsquot be seen until the year 2115.

Louis XIII Cognac, created in 1874, is a blend of 1,200 eaux-de-vie aged up to 100 years in cask, hence the film's title. Ludovic du Plessis, executive director of Louis XIII, said that there were bottles present on set, but remains in the dark as to the brandy's actual screentime in the film. &ldquoWill they cut it out? I don&rsquot know, I hope not,&rdquo he told Unfiltered.

The idea originated when du Plessis, previously at Dom Pérignon, joined Rémy Martin and spent time with cellar master Baptiste Loiseau. Du Plessis cited the 100 years to age the Cognac, typically four generations of cellar masters, saying, &ldquoI want everyone to know about &hellip our commitment to the mastery of time.&rdquo The 40-minute film took just over two months to make. He stressed that the film was produced by Louis XIII, but Rodriguez and Malkovich had full control over the plot line and creative direction.

The completed film has been placed in a safe made by security specialist Fichet-Bausche, complete with bulletproof glass and a timer that will automatically open in 100 years, in time for the premiere at the house of Louis XIII in Cognac, scheduled to take place on Nov. 18, 2115. A total of 1,000 invitations in the form of sliver-plated movie tickets are being distributed to celebrities and wine and spirits industry influencers from the Louis XIII family. Theoretically, the tickets will be passed down to future generations. While the film won't be seen by anyone anytime soon, it's still getting some social-media buzz. To find out more, just check out the hashtag #notcomingsoon.

GPS May Have Stemmed the Tide of Canadian Wine Crime Wave

Wineries in British Columbia&rsquos South Okanagan Valley have been hit with an alarming rash of break-ins over the past few weeks. Seventeen wineries in the region, among them Black Hills Estate, Church and State, Sumac Ridge, Tinhorn Creek Vineyards and Nk&rsquoMip Resort have been victimized, with thieves often hitting the same location more than once.

&ldquoThey come well-equipped,&rdquo Glenn Fawcett of Black Hills told Unfiltered. &ldquoThey smash the windows and grab what they want.&rdquo Church and State Wines has been broken into four times since June, losing an estimated $100,000 worth of tools, equipment, cash, electronics and even a tractor. Fawcett, who has spearheaded a movement to increase funding to local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) units, said the entire region has only one officer on duty between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., and most area wineries are quite isolated.

The crime wave may be over, however: According to Fawcett, two men and one woman were arrested and charged this week after three GPS-enabled four-wheelers stolen from Jackson-Triggs winery led the RCMP straight to the alleged culprits.

A New Vine Virus Strikes Napa

California grapegrowers have a new vine virus to worry about. In November, scientists at U.C. Davis&rsquo Foundation Plant Services (FPS) announced that a relatively new grapevine virus, known as Grapevine Pinot Gris Virus (GPGV) has been detected in Napa Valley grapevines. The virus was identified in seven vines out of 96 randomly selected samples by Davis-based lab-testing service Agri-Analysis.

Samples that tested positive included selections of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay from three separate Napa Valley vineyards. Symptoms associated with the virus include chlorotic leaf mottling (a condition in which leaves don't produce enough chlorophyll), leaf stunting and deformation, delayed vine growth, stunted canes and yield reductions.

The virus first appeared in Italy&rsquos Trentino-Alto Adige region in 2003. Since then, the virus has been detected in Italy, France, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, China and Japan. To date, disease symptoms have been most closely associated with Pinot Gris/Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Noir, Tocai Friulano and Glera (used for Prosecco). Studies have shown that the virus and its symptoms can be graft transmitted, and some studies indicate that the disease may also be vectored by a mite.

How great is the danger to California vineyards? According to FPS associate project scientist Maher Al Rwahnih, &ldquoPreliminary transmission studies show very low transmission rates.&rdquo Al Rwahnih has submitted a research proposal to do more extensive field surveys for detection of the virus.

Big-Name Champagnes Go Vegan

Vegan Champagne isn&rsquot precisely all the rage, but it&rsquos certainly gaining momentum, and not just for those looking for a sparkler to pair with their Tofurkey. Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot, Piper Heidsieck, Taittinger, and now Duval-Leroy have let it be known that their bubbles are vegan.

&ldquoWe already do the fining naturally. We don&rsquot use anything&mdashnot gelatin or egg whites or casein&mdashjust time,&rdquo said Julien Duval-Leroy, who runs the family business, Maison Duval-Leroy, with his two brothers Louis and Charles. "To become 100 percent vegan, we needed 20 years&rsquo experience. A colossal project was mounted to arrive at a method of natural clarification, mainly through the lengthening of time spent in vat or in barrel,&rdquo Charles told Unfiltered.

But Duval-Leroy only decided recently to go public with the information that their 4 million&ndashbottle production was 100 percent vegan friendly. &ldquoIn America, people want to know what they are consuming,&rdquo Charles said. And soon, he noted, European Union regulations will require vintners to list any possible allergens on the back label. &ldquoMore and more people are vegan or have allergies.&rdquo

At Champagne Duval-Leroy, the shift toward minimal intervention was motivated by a push toward improving quality. &ldquoIt makes the bubbles finer, more delicate, the wine richer and the texture is different&mdashit&rsquos silkier on the palate,&rdquo said Julien. Unfiltered suspects our favorite vegan vintner and former NBA star John Salley will be excited to add some new bubblies to his holiday menu this season.

Celebrating Latkes and Wine for Charity

For the potato pancake enthusiast, the December holiday season is the most wonderful time of year. Hanukkah brings with it a weeklong celebration of the latke, and in New York, this humble but delicious traditional treat gets an entire festival dedicated to celebrating its crisp, golden goodness. The seventh annual Latke Festival will take place this Monday, Dec. 7 at New York's Metropolitan Pavilion, and will showcase nearly 20 different dressed-up latkes from restaurants around the city, including the East Village's Ukrainian icon Veselka. (Unfiltered has our own, much simpler go-to latke recipe and wine pairing if you want to get in on the action at home.)

But these aren't your Bubbe's latkes: Unfiltered got a sneak peak of the festival's anticipated entries, which includes Toloache's latke de pato topped with duck confit tinga and chipotle Mae Mae Café's potato latke with red lentils, grilled Hudson Valley root vegetables and cardamom curry-scented yogurt and Taboon's spaghetti squash latke with deviled egg yolk, dill pollen and maitake mushrooms.

Event sponsor City Winery will be providing the wines. "The white we've chosen is a well-balanced, crisp, dry Sauvignon Blanc with citrus notes that we feel will pair extremely well with richer latkes," Raul Mesias, director of wine sales for the urban winery, told Unfiltered. The've also chosen a robust kosher Pinot Noir from Hyland Vineyards in the Willamette Valley. General admission is $65, and all proceeds from the event, hosted by Great Performances catering company, will go to the Sylvia Center, a nonprofit dedicated to encouraging healthy eating habits in young children and their families.


Watch the video: Pegasos Cinema Lab -10th Bridges International Film Festival-ΔΙεθνές Φεστιβάλ Κινηματογράφου ΓΕΦΥΡΕΣ


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