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Impossibly Easy Quiche

Impossibly Easy Quiche


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Crust fans who can't bake, rejoice!

Thienne Johnson/Shutterstock

If you can't get enough crust in your morning quiche, this easy recipe is for you. This recipe is also a great way to use leftover veggies and meat.

Ingredients

  • 6 Ounces raw vegetable of your choice (sliced mushrooms, bell pepper, onion, etc.)
  • 4 Ounces cooked breakfast meat of your choice (ham, bacon, ground beef)
  • 1 Cup shredded cheese of your choice (cheddar, Swiss and Colby Jack all work well)
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 Cups milk
  • 1/2 Cup biscuit mix, such as Bisquik
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Servings6

Calories Per Serving312

Folate equivalent (total)46µg11%

Riboflavin (B2)0.4mg32.2%


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Impossible Quiche (self-crusting)

This quiche is great for taking on picnics, it keeps well in the fridge, and is nice served either cold or warm for lunches or dinners with a salad.

It is also quick and economical to prepare and is what Mum calls a “throw it all in” recipe because leftovers in the fridge get thrown into the basic egg and flour mixture. Unlike usual quiche recipes, this one has no pastry base, and is known as a ‘self-crusting quiche’ because as the quiche bakes, the egg and cheese form the crust.

I think this is a fairly old recipe, and I am not sure as to why the word ‘impossible’ features in the title, because, to me, the recipe seems very possible, unless it is referring to the fact that a self-crusting quiche seems impossible? Who knows…

Below are two recipes – the first one is the original Impossible Quiche recipe, and the second is an example using ingredients that can be added to the original recipe.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE – The original base recipe:

Put all except bacon into jar with lid on and shake for 1 minute. Pour into greased dish and top with chopped bacon. Bake at 180 degrees Celsius for ¾ of an hour.

The above recipe in its original, simple form is fine on its own, but we take this recipe as the starting point and add into this many other ingredients depending on what is in the fridge.

The following recipe is an example of this where we added in leftover cooked pasta, leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, plus a selection of extra fresh vegetables. The result can be seen in the photo at the top of the page.

TIP: If you are adding a large amount of vegetables or vegetables with a high water content, (e.g. courgette or cooked spinach), you may need to adjust the recipe to add more eggs.

IMPOSSIBLE QUICHE (with additions)

1 cup cheese, grated (tasty and parmesan)

½ cup plain flour + ¾ tspn baking powder

A couple of stalks of chives

½ an orange capsicum, thinly sliced

1 cup leftover cooked pasta

leftover roast vegetables: parsnip, pumpkin, peas, cauliflower

Leftover cooked silverbeet, squeeze out water

A cheap dinner made from leftovers means there is more money to spend on a good wine….

With our Impossible Quiche we had a tasty red wine: Squawking Magpie, Hawke’s Bay, 2013, The Chatterer, Syrah.


Watch the video: Dieses einfache Quiche Rezept macht süchtig!


Comments:

  1. Sion

    An exceptional thought))))

  2. Mikael

    Well, so-so...

  3. Dustu

    In a fun way :)

  4. Cetus

    I think this is a delusion. I can prove it.

  5. Cingeswell

    Sorry for my intrusion… I understand this question. He is ready to help.



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